CLIMATE CHANGE AND AGRICULTURE

climate change and agriculture

 climate change and agriculture

Agriculture faces complex and unique challenges in the context of climate change. First, agriculture is especially fast because of the dependence on weather and climate conditions. The section already exists experience the negative effects of high temperatures, variable rainfall, harmful insects, etc.
Extreme weather events are becoming more common, which are getting worse as climate change accelerates.
At the same time, agriculture is a major source of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, both directly and indirectly.
(through wind farms linked to production) and indirectly (through land use change due to
expansion). Overall, agriculture, forestry and other land use (AFOLU) accounted for about one fifth (22%).
Global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Half of which comes from the emissions of methane and nitrous oxide on farms,
and the other half of CO2 emissions are from land use, land use change and deforestation (LULUCF). Methane has a particularly strong effect on short-term temperatures, and the attenuation of this gas is
important for stabilizing climate change by mid-century. There is nothing, things from agriculture
continues to rise, and the fraction of the total air volume can increase as the other fractions dissolve.

 Major climate impacts on agriculture

 
Climate change can affect agriculture locally and regionally. The main effects are described in this section. 

1. Evolution of agricultural productivity

Climate change can improve or worsen economic conditions in different regions. For example, changes in temperature, precipitation, and frost-free days lead to longer growing seasons in nearly every state. Long growing seasons can have both positive and negative effects on food production. Some farmers may grow taller crops or outgrow the entire cropping cycle, while others may need to provide more water during warmer growing seasons. Air pollution can also damage crops, trees and forests. For example, when plants absorb too much ozone from the ground, they experience reduced photosynthesis, slow growth, and are more susceptible to disease.
 
Climate change may also increase the threat of wildfires. Wildfires pose a major threat to farmland, grasslands and grasslands. Changes in temperature and rainfall will further increase the presence and extent of insects, weeds and diseases. This can lead to an increased need for weeding and pest control.
 
Advertising is important for more than 100 crops grown in the United States. Warmer temperatures and changing rainfall can affect the flowering and release of pollinators, such as bees and butterflies. If it is between the plant season and when pollinators appear, pollination can be reduced.

 2. Effects on soil and water

Climate change is expected to increase the frequency of storms in the United States, which can harm crops by damaging soil and reducing soil nutrients. Heavy rains can also cause agricultural runoff to flow into oceans, lakes and streams. This drainage can affect water quality. When combined with warmer water caused by climate change, the release of water can lead to lower oxygen levels in the body of water. This is called hypoxia. Hypoxia can kill fish and fish. It can also affect their ability to find food and shelter, which in turn can harm coastal communities and the economies that depend on these ecosystems.

 High seas and heavy rains also threaten coastal farming communities. These threats include erosion, loss of agricultural land and salt water intrusion, which can pollute water. Climate change is expected to exacerbate these threats.

3.  Health challenges for farmers and livestock


Farmers face many climate-related health risks. These include exposure to heat and other extreme weather conditions, excessive exposure to pesticides due to overpopulation of insects, disease-carrying insects such as mosquitoes and ticks, and poor nutrition. . Language barriers, lack of access to health care and other factors can increase these risks. Temperature and humidity can also affect the health and production of animals raised for meat, milk and eggs.
For more specific examples of climate change impacts in your area, please see the National Climate Survey.

 Agriculture and the economy

Agriculture contributed more than $1.1 trillion to the US domestic product in 2019. The sector accounted for 10.9% of total US employment, or more than 22 million jobs. These are not only jobs in agriculture, but also jobs in the food industry and other related industries. him. Food is the largest sector of these jobs with 13 million.
 
Meat, corn, dairy products and soybeans are the most profitable products. The United States is also a major exporter of soybeans, other plant products, fruits, animal feed, and beef and veal.

 Environmental justice

Many of the hired farmers are immigrants from Mexico and Central America. Most of the hired farm workers are not migrant workers; instead, they work in a place 75 kilometers from their home. Many indentured farmers may be more exposed to climate health risks due to social factors, such as language barriers and access to health care.
 
Climate change may affect the food security of some households in the country. Most American families now have a grocery store. This means that everyone in the family has enough food to live an active and healthy life. However, 13.8 million US households (about one-tenth of all US households) were food insecure at least some of the time in 2020.34 U.S. below-average food insecure households including those with incomes below the poverty line, those headed by women, and those with women We can reduce the impact of climate change on agriculture in a sustainable way variety, including:
 
 Enter the best farming method of the weather. Farmers can use weather forecasting tools, cover crops and other measures to help manage climate production risks. Join AgSTAR. Farmers can get help to recover methane, a greenhouse gas, from the biogas produced when food rots. Reduce rainfall. Farmers can apply fertilizers more efficiently, keep their animals in waterways, and do more to reduce runoff. Increases crop resistance. Adopt research-based approaches to reduce climate change impacts on crops and livestock, such as reducing pesticide use and improving pollution. Prevent food waste. Stretch your dollar and reduce your carbon footprint by carefully organizing your groceries and storing food properly. Donate wholesome, nutritious food to food banks and those in need.
 
See other actions you can take, and steps companies can take on the EPA's What You Can Do About Climate Change page. Black or Hispanic owners and tenants.
 
Climate change may also affect the food security of some indigenous peoples in Hawaii and other Pacific islands belonging to the United States. Climate impacts such as sea level rise and heavy rainfall can affect the production of crops such as taro, breadfruit and mango. These crops are often a source of nutrition and can also be of cultural and economic importance.

How can we handle the situation?

 We can reduce the impact of climate change on agriculture in a number of ways, including:

  • Enter the best farming method of the weather. Farmers can use weather forecasting tools, cover crops and other measures to help manage climate production risks.
  •  Join AgSTAR. Farmers can get help to recover methane, a greenhouse gas, from the biogas produced when food rots. 
  • Reduce rainfall. Farmers can apply fertilizers appropriately, keep their animals out of the watershed, and do many things to reduce nutrient runoff.
  • Increases crop resistance. Adopt research-based approaches to reduce climate change impacts on crops and livestock, such as reducing pesticide use and improving pollution.
  • Prevent food waste. Stretch your dollar and reduce your carbon footprint by carefully planning your purchases and storing food wisely. Donate wholesome, nutritious food to food banks and those in need.

  

 

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