WHEN TO SWITCH FROM CHICK STARTER TO GROWER: A GUIDE FOR POULTRY FARMERS

When to switch from Chick Starter to Grower: A Guide for Poultry Farmers


 
When to switch from Chick Starter to Grower: A Guide for Poultry Farmers
 
Knowing when to switch from starter feed to grower feed is an important part of raising good chickens.
 
Chickens need different nutrients at different times of their lives, and feeding them the right amount can help them grow and develop well. 

How long does starter last? And how long does grower last?
 
Chicken starters are usually given to chicks in the first few weeks of their lives. This food is rich in protein and other nutrients that help the chicks grow and become healthy birds.
 
As chicks grow, they need less protein and more calcium to support the growth of their bones and feathers. This is where grower feed comes in.
 
Grower feeds are formulated to meet the nutritional needs of growing chicks as they transition from chicken feed to layer feed. This food has less protein than chick starter, but lots of calcium and other minerals that promote healthy bone and feather growth.
 
It's important to switch from starter to grower feed at the right time to ensure your chickens continue to get the nutrients they need to thrive. 

Understanding the basics
 
When it comes to raising chickens, it is important to understand the sources of chicken feed and grower feeds.
 
Although they are similar, they are also so different that change is necessary. 

This section will cover the differences between these two types of feed, the nutrients chickens and the growing chicks need, and how to choose the right feed for your flock.


What is chick starter feed? 

Chicken starter feed is a type of feed designed for chickens.
 It is rich in protein and contains all the nutrients that chicks need to grow and develop. Chicken starters usually come in three different forms: pellets, crumbles and mash.
 

Pellets are small, compressed pellets of feed, crumbles are small pieces of feed, and mash is a fine powder. 

What is a Grower feed?

 Grower feed is a form of feed formulated for growing chickens. It is lower in protein than poultry feed and has different nutritional levels to support the growth and development of chickens as they grow.
 Grower feeds are usually in pellet or crumb form.

 How are Chick starter and Grower Feed different?
 

The main difference between chick starter feed and grower feed is the amount of protein and nutrients they contain. Chicken starter feed is high in protein and contains all the nutrients chicks need to grow and develop.
 
On the other hand, grower feeds are low in protein and contain different levels of nutrients to support the growth and development of chickens as they grow. Poultry feed that are high in protein can cause kidney failure in chickens, so it's best to stay within recommended levels.

What Nutrients do Chicks need?

Chicken needs protein, calcium and other important nutrients.
 
Protein is important for muscle and tissue development, while calcium is important for bone growth and tissue formation. Chick food usually contains 18-20% protein and high levels of calcium, as well as other important vitamins and minerals.


What Nutrients do Growing chickens need?

As chickens grow, their nutritional needs change.
 
Although they still need protein and calcium, this level is lower than what chickens need. Grower feeds usually contain about 16-18% protein and low levels of calcium, along with other essential vitamins and minerals.

When to switch to Grower Feed
 
Switching from starter chicken feed to grower feed is an important step in the growth and development of backyard chickens. Here are some things to consider when deciding when to make a change:

  •  Age of chicks

 Chicks starters are usually fed to chicks for the first four to eight weeks of their lives. After four weeks, chicks can be injected with grower feed. However, the exact age of transition can vary depending on the type and growth of chicks. Laying hen can be fed for a long time. 

For meat birds, do not feed starter more than more four weeks. Poultry, especially Cornish Crosses, grow quickly and can have heart attacks if they grow too fast.

Growth rate of chicks
 
Fast-growing chickens may need to be fed with grower feed earlier than those that grow more slowly.
 
It is important to monitor the growth of chicks and prepare their feed in an appropriate way.

Feather Development of the Chicks
 
As chicks grow and develop their wings, they need more protein in their diet. Starter feed tend to be higher in protein than growers, making them the best choice for chicks with developed feather. Chickens are generally fully feathered after five to six weeks.


Water Consumption
 
Chicks need plenty of water to grow and develop properly. If the chicks are drinking a lot of water and not eating much, it may be time to switch to grower feed to ensure they are getting the right amount of feed.
 
In general, it is important to monitor the growth and development of backyard chickens and adjust their diet as necessary. Switching from chick feed to grower feed at the right time can help ensure healthy growth and development.


Converting from starter chicken feed to grower feed

How to change
 

To change from chick starter to grower feed, it is important to do this gradually over a period of 7 to 10 days. Start by mixing a small amount of grower feed with chicken starter, gradually increasing the amount of planter food each day until the chicks are eating only grower feed.

When to change
 
Chickens can be moved from starter to grower feed in about 6 to 8 weeks, depending on their breed and size. For birds of prey, they are not fed for more than four weeks. It is important to ensure that they have plenty of clean water during the transition. 

What to expect during transition
 

During the transition period, chicks may experience digestive upset or changes in their stools.

We haven't had any change issues, but know that it can happen.

 
Medicated chick starter feed
 

Some chick starter feeds contain antibiotics to help prevent disease. If you are using medicated chicken starter feed, it is important to switch to non-medicated chicken feed after the transition period.
 
This will help prevent antibiotic resistance in your flock. In general, switching from starter to grower feeds is important in raising happy and healthy chickens. By following these simple steps, you can help ensure a healthy transition for your flock.

 Choosing the right feed for your flock
Organic feed

 

Organic feed is becoming increasingly popular among backyard chicken breeders. It is made from non-GMO corn and is free of pesticides, herbicides and other chemicals. Organic chicken feed is more expensive than conventional feed, but it can help ensure that your chickens are getting a proper diet.


Medicated feed
 
Medicated feed is designed to prevent disease in your flock. Medicated chick starter feed is often used to prevent coccidiosis, a common disease in young chickens. It contains a drug called amprolium, which helps prevent coccidiosis. However, it is important to note that medicinal feed should not be used for laying hens, because they can affect egg production.


Layer Feed
 
Layer feed is designed for laying hens. It has high levels of calcium, which is important for egg production. Laying chicken feed is available in the form of pellets, crumbs and mash. Start feeding the hen and raising the chicks when they are about 16 to 18 weeks old. At 20 weeks, they will start laying eggs. 

Meat Birds
 
If you're raising chickens for meat, you'll want to choose a food made for meat birds.
 
Bird feed contains high protein to promote rapid growth. Poultry feed is available in the form of pellets, crumbs and mash.
 
When choosing the right feed for your flock, it is important to consider their age, growth rate and nutritional needs. Chicken starter feed is designed for baby chicks, while grower food is designed for older chickens and baby chicks.
 
As your hens begin to lay eggs, you will want to move to a layer diet to ensure they get the calcium needed for egg production. In addition to choosing the right feed, it is also important to provide your flock with clean water and a healthy environment.
 

Pecking and disease can also affect the health of your flock, so it is important to monitor your chickens for signs of disease and give them appropriate care. Overall, choosing the right feed for your flock is an important part of raising happy and healthy chickens.
 
By understanding the nutritional needs of your flock and choosing feed that meets those needs, you can help ensure that your chickens are healthy and productive. Knowing the right time to go from the beginning to the breeding ground will help ensure that the pet is healthy and happy.

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