13 FAMOUS PLANTS THAT YOU SHOULD NOT GROW IN YOUR GARDEN

13 famous plants that you should not grow in your garden

 13 famous plants that you should not grow in your garden

 
Many plants are beautiful, but not all of them are useful in the garden. Some of the other cultivars can be aggressive, toxic or attractive to unwanted insects - words you probably don't want to say. 

Check out this list of 13 trees, shrubs and other plants you should think twice about planting on your property.

1. Butterfly Bush (Buddleja Davidii)
 

1. Butterfly Bush (Buddleja Davidii)

You've probably seen many butterfly plants offered at your local nursery or garden center. But some butterfly forests can become a big problem for the environment. The butterfly bush can attack itself by self-seeding, especially in areas where it does not hibernate during the winter. This can crowd out other desirable plants that serve as a host plant throughout the butterflies' life cycle. A butterfly bush is not a tree for butterfly caterpillars.

To avoid this problem, look for new plants that do not have seeds, which will not spread in the environment, or opt for ground azaleas, oakleaf hydrangeas, trees or other shrubs

2. English Ivy (Hedera Helix)

2. English Ivy (Hedera Helix)


If you've ever grown English ivy, you know why it's on this list. This vine can kill trees it climbs and damage structures by getting into gutters, concrete or aluminum siding. It can destroy the vegetation of many native plants that are valuable to wildlife, especially the aquatic ephemerals that provide refuge for bees and other pollinators early in the season. It also causes vegetable blight, a disease that is problematic for some plants and trees.
 
Instead of ivy, opt for ground cover plants such as wild strawberry (Fragaria virginiana), Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia), wild stonecrop (Sedum ternatum), blue violet (Viola sororia) or creeping phlox. (phlox stolonifera).

Read also:10 TIPS FOR GROWING TOMATO PLANTS IN A POT

3. Wisteria (Wisteria Sinensis or Wisteria Floribunda)
 

3. Wisteria (Wisteria Sinensis or Wisteria Floribunda)

These beautiful vines look attractive on an arbor or trellis, but they can quickly take over the space where they are planted. Wisteria spreads quickly, outcompetes other species and can kill young plants There are ground types, such as Kentucky wisteria (wisteria macrostachya) or American wisteria (wisteria frutescens), which will be easy to manage. Or opt for coral honeysuckle (lonicera sempervirens), which is a favorite of hummingbirds.

4. Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera Japonica)

3. Wisteria (Wisteria Sinensis or Wisteria Floribunda)  These beautiful vines look attractive on an arbor or trellis, but they can quickly take over the space where they are planted. Wisteria spreads quickly, outcompetes other species and can kill young plants There are ground types, such as Kentucky wisteria (wisteria macrostachya) or American wisteria (wisteria frutescens), which will be easy to manage. Or opt for coral honeysuckle (lonicera sempervirens), which is a favorite of hummingbirds.  4. Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera Japonica)

This fast-growing, fragrant plant should be on your list of plants to avoid growing. Japanese honeysuckle has been a popular garden choice for years, but it's getting into the wild and overpowering native vines. Instead, look for groundcover species such as coral honeysuckle (lonicera sempervirens).

5. Periwinkle (Vinca)  

3. Wisteria (Wisteria Sinensis or Wisteria Floribunda) These beautiful vines look attractive on an arbor or trellis, but they can quickly take over the space where they are planted. Wisteria spreads quickly, outcompetes other species and can kill young plants There are ground types, such as Kentucky wisteria (wisteria macrostachya) or American wisteria (wisteria frutescens), which will be easy to manage. Or opt for coral honeysuckle (lonicera sempervirens), which is a favorite of hummingbirds. 4. Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera Japonica)  This fast-growing, fragrant plant should be on your list of plants to avoid growing. Japanese honeysuckle has been a popular garden choice for years, but it's getting into the wild and overpowering native vines. Instead, look for groundcover species such as coral honeysuckle (lonicera sempervirens).  5. Periwinkle (Vinca)

These beautiful (and popular!) flowers may seem like the perfect addition to a pollinator garden, but they're plants that won't grow. Vinca needs a little something to survive and make a ground cover that prevents whatever's underneath. This doesn't benefit the wildlife, and it will take away the crops that the local wildlife needs to survive.

6. Burning bush (Euonymus)

Known for its bright red foliage, this bush makes a spectacular addition to the landscape. But you can damage the environment. Birds disperse the seeds into forests and grasslands where they can quickly grow in the wild and compete with natives.  Instead, choose a native plant that suits your area.

7. Privet hedges (Ligustrum)  

Their large growth makes them popular for creating a natural privacy screen in your garden, but it can also make them a nuisance for ground plants. Privets form dense thickets that overshadow native trees and shrubs, quickly crowding them and depriving native wildlife of what they need. Instead, choose a variety of viburnum, which can help provide privacy but also helps wildlife.

8. Heavenly or Sacred Bamboo (Nandina)

Once you start this medication, it can be difficult to stop. It's controlled by spreading the roots deep into the soil, which is very difficult and can be expensive to remove completely. You can change it to a strawberry plant (euonymus americanus), which has the same red color. 

Read also:HOW TO GROW SPINACH - INDOORS OR OUTDOORS FOR HEALTHY LEAVES

9. Japanese Spirea (Spiraea Japonica)

 This plant controls problem areas, such as construction zones: this is any area that has been removed or disturbed by vegetation. Spirea grows quickly and quickly conquers native in meadows and forest clearing. There are spirea that you can plant instead, as a steeple in a full lawn.

10. Tropical Milkweed (Asclepias Currassavica)

 Milkweed is known as a butterfly magnet, but this species has self-seeded in temperate regions of the United States. Big problem? Because they don't die back during the winter months like other milkweed species, a parasite called ophryocystis elektroscirrha (OE) can build up on the plants.

Research has also shown that older monarchs in OE have many problems. Research has shown that it is successful in migration, as well as reducing body size, life expectancy, mate success and flight ability.  So, skip the milk and choose some other type of soil instead. 

11. Bradford Pear (Pyrus Calleryana)

A common tree that you can find on the street, this popular type of tree suffers from maintenance problems. Over time, the tree can weaken and fall, and it can seriously damage it. It does not support as many insects or birds as other options. If you're looking for something different, try Saskatoon berry or shadbush. They bloom at the same time and produce edible fruit. Ultimately, this will bring more life to your garden. Some states have begun to ban the sale of these plants.

12. Japanese Barberry (Berberis Thunbergii)  

Areas with many popular trees tend to have a high tick population. It is mice, plants and trees, which provide an uncontrolled environment for mice, which is the main cause of disease and greater exposure to ticks for humans. A good choice? Go for blueberries instead.

13. Asian Sweet and Sour (Cestrus Orbiculatus)

These bitter species are banned because of their ability to take over other plants and even trees. There are an American bittersweet variety, but this version is more than that. If you're looking for another vine, try trumpet honeysuckle or American wisteria. There are also ground types of clematis.

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